UNBORN WORD of the day


THE CONVERSION OF ST. PAUL AND UNBORN JESUS
June 4, 2009, 4:19 pm
Filed under: Pro-life, Unborn Jesus
The most frequent representations of pregnancy in medieval and early-modern Christian art show the expectant Virgin Mary. Jesus is depicted as a child inside her transparent womb or, in sculptures, within a niche closed by glass doors. This early-18th-century oil painting is found in the Diocesan Museum, St Pölten, Austria.

The most frequent representations of pregnancy in medieval and early-modern Christian art show the expectant Virgin Mary. Jesus is depicted as a child inside her transparent womb or, in sculptures, within a niche closed by glass doors. This early-18th-century oil painting is found in the Diocesan Museum, St Pölten, Austria.

With the stoning of St. Stephen, the first Christian martyr “a great persecution arose against the church in Jerusalem” and “Saul laid waste the church, and entering house after house, he dragged off men and women and committed them to prison” (Act 8:1,3). Paul got authorization from the High Priest to go to other cities and round about Christians, so he set out for Damascus. The story of his conversion is well known. A light flashes around him, he falls to the ground and he and his companions hear a voice: “’Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?’ And he said, ‘Who are you, Lord?’ And he said, ‘I am Jesus who you are persecuting…’” (Acts 9:1-5).

It has frequently been noted that Saul was persecuting Christians (or as they were called back then, followers of ‘the Way’). So Saul, we assume was surprised by the question posed to him; “…why do you persecute me?”…”me” as it turned out being “Jesus”. Saul probably did not think he was persecuting “Jesus” who he thought to be merely a dead controversial rabbi. Yet, it is revealed to him that in persecuting followers of ‘the Way’ he indeed is directly persecuting Jesus.

Today, in a very different set of circumstances, we see a worldwide persecution of unborn babies…an unrelenting persecution. The persecutors all have legal authorization to do their deadly deeds, in fact, in some quarters many of them are considered heroes (just as Paul probably was in his zealous roundup of defenseless Christians). These unborn children – each on his or her ‘Way’ to being born – are each personally identified with Jesus. Millions of our fellow citizens would be shocked if they heard the words from Unborn Jesus calling them by name and asking them: “Why do you persecute me?” But we have similar words from Jesus in the New Testament: “Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me…” (Mt 18:5) And “Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brethren, you did it to me” (Mt 25:40).

Many abortionists and women who have had abortions (and men involved with abortion) have had their own conversion on the road to Damascus when each, in his or her own way, have heard Jesus personally calling them and asking “Why do you persecute me?” And they have become inspired and eloquent defenders of the unborn, following in the footsteps of St. Paul. Let us continue to pray for those who support and promote abortion, just as St. Stephen prayed for Saul and his misguided companions (Acts 7:60).

detail of Unborn Jesus from The pregnant Virgin

detail of Unborn Jesus from The pregnant Virgin


3 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Good Morning, Michele!
Great morning read. Right now I’m reading Taylor Caldwell’s 1970 book Lion of God, the story of St. Paul’s conversion. It starts with his birth, and it is fiction, but what an exciting journey the reader takes. While reading, it is obvious that Mrs. Caldwell was Christian, but I couldn’t detect any specifics. In the last major chapter of the book where Sts. Paul, Timothy, Barnabas, etc are preaching, Mrs. Caldwell lays out the Assumption, transubstantiation,the primacy of St. Peter, etc. WOW! Guess I know that she was a Catholic.

Love to read the daily postings. THANK YOU and George. Geri

Comment by Geri Urrutia

Thanks Geri,

I read a lot of Taylor Caldwell in my 20’s – she is a really great writer. I don’t think that I read the Lion of God – it sounds like it’s a great book.

Thanks for the compliment. We have had to slow down a bit lately for personal reasons but hope to keep it up even if not as frequently as we have in the past.

Michele

Comment by unbornwordoftheday

I am reading Pope Benedict’s “St. Paul.” Very good read, not as intense as “Jesus.”

God bless!

Comment by Brian




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